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FY20 Community Benefit Board Initiative (CBBI) Grant Application

The Health Project Community Benefit Initiative Grant program was created to facilitate the investment of community benefit funds allocated to the Health Project’s Advisory Board of Directors by Mercy Health Muskegon.   This discretionary fund supports initiatives and/or programs that address health needs identified in Mercy’s most recent Community Health Needs Assessment and Implementation Strategy, as well as strengthen and sustain our organizational Mission in the community.

Like all such programs, we expect the demand for these funds exceeds availability. For this reason, we have developed specific guidelines for funding that are intended to ensure that each request is evaluated fairly and that all applicants adhere to the intent of the program.

The Project Advisory Board is requesting proposals for the FY20 Community Benefit Board Initiative Grants. The Community Benefit Board Initiative Grants are awarded yearly to organizations for programs that address ranked issues in the 2019 Mercy Health Community Health Needs Assessment. This grant is open to all non-profits in Mercy Health’s service area of Muskegon, Oceana and Newaygo Counties.

Funding request for up to $25,000 will be considered.

The Health Project Board may award grants of $10,000 or less if funding is available after Principal grants are approved

All applicants are required to submit a Letter of Intent on the form provided to be considered for funding.

Deadline for Letters of Intent is March 1st at 5:00 P.M.

Application Guidelines – CBBI Grant Application FY20

Sister Simone Courtade Grant Application 2019-2020

The Sister Simone Courtade Grant Program was created by the Sisters of Mercy to support, strengthen and sustain our organizational Mission in the community. The specific intent of the fund is to help poor and underserved residents achieve a better quality of life by improving their health and overall well-being through investment in community programs that address community health needs.

Like all such programs, the demand for these funds exceeds availability. For this reason, we have developed specific guidelines for funding that are intended to ensure that each request is judged fairly and that all applicants adhere to the traditional mission and spiritual intent of the program. This process is to be an inclusive process with opportunity for submission open to all nonprofit community entities.

There are two tiers for awarded grants:

There are two tiers for awarded grants: Tier I over $3,000 up to $10,000; and Tier II less than or equal to $3,000.

All applicants are required to submit a Letter of Intent on the form provided to be considered for funding.

Deadline for Letters of Intent is Friday, March 1st at 5:00 P.M.

Budget Template, Grant Timeline, and 2019-2020 Grant Application:

Sister Simone Courtade Grant Application 2019-20

2019-20 Sister Simone Budget Template

2019-20 TIMELINE

 

Recreational Marijuana Laws: What You Need to Know

Recreational Marijuana Laws: What you need to know

Voters in Michigan passed the recreational marijuana proposal in November.  So what does this mean for Michigan? We hope this article answers some of your questions about the new recreational marijuana law.

What is Marijuana?
Marijuana, or cannabis, is a psychoactive drug from the cannabis plant. Marijuana can be smoked, inhaled as a vapor, added to food, or applied directly to the skin. Signs of marijuana use may include bloodshot eyes, increased heart rate, sleepiness, poor coordination, delayed reaction time, and increased appetite  (American Addiction Centers, 2018; Narconon, 2018).

Medical Marijuana vs. Recreational Marijuana
• Medical Marihuana is still marijuana.
• The drug comes from the same grow operations.
• Having a medical card does not mean it can be picked up at a pharmacy like a prescription.

Marijuana is Classified as a Schedule 1 Drug under the Federal Government.

Marijuana/marihuana is a Schedule 1 Drug under the Michigan Public Health Code MCL 333.7212.  A drug is a Schedule 1 if the Michigan Board of Pharmacy “finds that the substance has a high potential for abuse and has no accepted medical use in treatment in the United States or lacks accepted safety for use in treatment under medical supervision.”

Marijuana and the Workplace: High Doesn’t Get You Hired

  • This includes the Controlled Substances Act, the Drug Free Workforce Act and the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act. The Drug-Free Workplace Act of 1988 is an act of the United States, which requires some Federal contractors and all Federal grantees to agree that they will provide drug-free workplaces as a precondition of receiving a contract or grant from a Federal agency.
  • Employers will continue to drug test potential employees during the hiring process; and if there were an accident onsite, it is possible the employer could be under the influence. Under proposal 1, it does not require employers to drug test.
  • Employers still hold a zero-tolerance policy regarding drugs, which can result in termination.

Drugged Driving is Impaired Driving

  • It is Illegal to drive under the influence of marijuana and/or any substance; it is illegal to consume substances while driving, and people cannot smoke marijuana inside the passenger compartment of a car or truck while it is on a public road. There is also an existing law that addresses operating a vehicle while under the influence, with passengers under the age of 16, that still applies. The penalty for breaking that law— MCL 257.625(7).

It is Illegal to Consume Marijuana in Public

  • Individuals can have up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana on their person, and up to 10 ounces of marijuana in their home. Depending upon the potency of the marijuana, 2.5 ounces could produce as many as 100 joints or as few as 30. Individuals can have up to 15 grams of cannabis concentrates and up to 12 cannabis plants in the home.

It is Illegal to Take Marijuana Out of State

  • Exporting recreational or medical marijuana from Michigan to other states is strictly prohibited and illegal under both Proposal 1 and the Michigan Medical Marijuana Act. Medical cannabis is only for the patient for whom it was purchased; and, therefore, cannot be sold, transferred or exported to anyone in or out of the State of Michigan.  Forms of exporting include, but are not limited to, mailing, driving, shipping, flying or boating cannabis across state lines.

Cultivation Laws

Proposal 1 permits any adult 21 years of age or older to legally cultivate up to 12 cannabis plants in their residence, as long as there are no more than 12 plants total within the residence.  Medical patients in Michigan are also allowed to cultivate their own plants. Under the Michigan Medical Marijuana Act, it is permissible for qualified patients or caregivers to cultivate up to 12 marijuana plants as well. Whether growing medically or recreationally, all cannabis plants must be grown inside locked, secured and enclosed facilities that are not visible to the public.

Youth Access is Still Illegal: No Matter How You Feel about Marijuana, it is Still Bad for Youth.

• It is illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to consume or purchase marijuana and THC-infused products.
• According the Michigan Profile for a Healthy Youth Survey (MiPHY), which is a survey administered by MDHHS to 12 schools in Muskegon County every two years, 1 in 3 high school students has tried marijuana, and 7 out 10 students who use e-cig products are 11 times more likely to vape marijuana.

Although legal cannabis was approved in Michigan, it is important to note that consumers will not be able to purchase it commercially right away. Initial predictions signal that Michigan’s cannabis sales will not begin until early 2020, as state lawmakers still need to iron out regulations and licensing.

For more information about the Marijuana Laws in Michigan, please review this document: An Overview of Michigan Recreational Marihuana Law

CHIR Introduces and Promotes a New MI Bridges Website

The CHIR, the Community Health Innovation Region, is a broad partnership of community organizations, local government agencies, business entities, health care providers, investors, and community members coming together to make a collective impact on the way health care is delivered and received. The goal of this collaborative effort is to improve access to and provisions of health care in our community, ultimately improving the quality of life for all who live here. Using a data driven process, representatives from partnering organizations identify community needs, make decisions, and implement strategies to improve outcomes. Points of focus are physical wellness, behavioral wellness, education, employment, food, housing, environment, and transportation. For more information on the CHIR, please visit www.chirmuskegon.com .

The CHIR works to create and support linkages between its partners, always with a focus to break down barriers in accessing community resources in Michigan. One such innovation is the promotion and implementation of the MI Bridges initiative, developed as a partnership with MDHHS and found through the new MI Bridges website.

The CHIR collaborated with Community Health Workers at the Health Project to bring physician and provider offices information about the MI Bridge card and the new MI Bridges website. The purpose of the MI Bridge card outlines the process of applying for state benefits, and the MI Bridges website offers additional resources to assist patients in receiving equal health care services.

According to Emma Johnston, a Community Health Worker at the Health Project “The card can walk a client through a step by step process on how to utilize the MI Bridges website. Clients can now apply for benefits, and check the status of their case, without needing to talk to their caseworker. This gives the client more independence and real-time updates on their case. The website also gives the client many resources and information at their fingertips.”

The card also offers resource information and a phone number that a patient can call to speak directly to a HUB Pathways Referral Specialist. If a patient or client needs assistance with accessing the MI Bridges information, they may contact the Health Project and meet with a Community Health Worker to assist them with their account information and applying for benefits. The CHIR hopes that the individual will find other additional resources he or she did not know were available before. This will expose other community partners to local agencies for further collaboration, and in the long term, addressing the social determents of health by breaking down barriers in receiving equal health care services.

On January 1, 2019, the MI Bridges website was updated with current community resources and information due to the partnership with 2-1-1. The website creates a virtual and online source to access 2-1-1 and links sources closest to the client. 2-1-1 is a nationwide service connecting over 14 million people to services every year. Previously, a client would search for local resources through a local 2-1-1 provider, or call 2-1-1. Now, due of the innovative partnership, new and available resources are updated on the MI Bridges website, which may be accessed by phone, computer, etc.

Shonie Blake, a Community Health Worker at the Health Project, notices the positive changes the website will have on clients who apply for benefits. “Caseworkers are going to be relying more on clients to upload their documentation to the MI Bridges account, which means the information will be more accessible to the client and to their caseworkers. Previously, a client would be assigned to one caseworker from DHHS (Department of Health and Human Services). Now, the 360 System will allow multiple caseworkers access to the same case. The updated MI Account System will allow clients to view all of their documentation, receive real-time letters on their case, and have overall improved communication with their caseworkers. Previously, clients would feel disconnected on communication from DHHS. Sometimes it would take weeks to receive letters in the mail or to hear back from their caseworker. Now, all documentation may be accessed online, at the client’s own convenience.”

The CHIR team is urging offices to distribute and promote the Bridge card to every patient due to the unlimited resources patients may benefit from the MI Bridges website. Cards are also available in Spanish. Please contact Michael Ramsey at Michael.ramsey@mercyhealth.com for more information, or to have the free MI Bridges cards delivered to offices.

Health Project Community Health Workers are here to help create accounts, upload documents, and to answer any questions patients may have about their case. For questions, please call 231-672-3201 or visit us at www.mchp.org .

Health Project Offers Assistance During Open Enrollment

“We have more enrollment in Medicare this year than we have in ACA in past years,” stated Liz Chala, Community Health Worker Lead at the Health Project.

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) enrollment period started on November 1st and ended December 31st. The Medicare enrollment period started November 15th and ended December 15th.

In 2018, the Health Project enrolled 57 clients into the Affordable Care Act (ACA) program that provided health insurance plans, and 73 clients into Medicare. In 2018, the Health Project direct staff enrolled approximately 558 clients into other programs for services and health care.

When the ACA first started, new patients were signing into a health plan, where this year, numbers have decreased, with recurring patients coming in to renew their plan in ACA. The Health Project has seen an increase in Medicare patients who can apply if they are 65 years old, disabled or are in kidney renal failure.


The clients who come into the Health Project can be assured that they are being taken care of by highly trained Community Health Workers. “They Rock!” exclaimed Liz Chala. “They are dedicated, hardworking, and always providing updated information in the best interests of our patients.” The Community Health Workers are trained to be ACA Enrollment Specialists, attending training every July.  Medicare Certified Enrollment Specialists are located at both Oceana and Muskegon locations.

Since 2014, when the Affordable Care Act was first implemented, the Health Project has seen a change in promotion. Liz Chala explains that “the very first year ACA came out, the Health Project hosted neighborhood canvassing every Saturday, during the month of October. Rack cards were distributed to community members and neighborhoods to raise awareness of the programs and services they can access at the Health Project, including the health care insurance plans through the ACA”. Now, you may see Public Service Announcements, social media ads, and bus ads to increase awareness of open enrollment and other services the Health Project offers. In Oceana, placemats are distributed to restaurants.

According to the New York Times, nearly 20 million people have gained health insurance since 2010, and that Michigan is one of the states with the lowest percentage of uninsured residents.

To make an appointment at the Health Project, please call 231-672-3201, or walk-ins are welcomed from 9 am to 4 pm, Monday through Fridays, at our Muskegon office. If you are an Oceana resident, please call 231.861.0321 to make an appointment. Clients will need to bring a driver’s license, bank statement, proof of income and taxes, and insurance cards. We have Spanish speaking staff available.

 

Take the CHNA Survey

Filling out the CHNA survey is your chance to be heard! It‘s how we know what your health care needs are so we can improve our services and create programs to help you live a healthier life. We can’t improve things unless we know what’s needed!

Click on the links below to take the survey:

English: bit.ly/CHNA2019English

Spanish: bit.ly/CHNA2019Spanish

Community Benefit Board Initiative Grants – Letters of Intent Due March 2nd

The Project Advisory Board is requesting proposals for the FY19 Community Benefit Board Initiative Grants. The Community Benefit Board Initiative Grants are awarded yearly to organizations for programs that address ranked issues in the 2017 Mercy Health Community Health Needs Assessment. This grant is open to all non-profits in Mercy Health’s service area of Muskegon, Oceana and Newaygo Counties.

The Health Project Community Benefit Initiative Grant program was created to facilitate the investment of community benefit funds allocated to the Health Project’s Board of Directors by Mercy Health Muskegon. The discretionary funds supports initiatives and/or programs that address health needs identified in the Mercy’s most recent Community Health Needs Assessment and Implementation Strategy, as well as strengthen and sustain our organizational Mission in the community.

Funding request for up to $25,000 will be considered. The Health Project Board may award grants of $10,000 or less if funding is available after Principal grants are approved.

All applicants are required to submit a Letter of Intent on the form provided to be considered for funding.

Deadline for Letters of Intent is March 2nd by 5:00 P.M.

CB Initiative Budget Template FY19
CB Initiative Grant Application FY19

Sr. Simone Courtade Grant Application 2018-2019

The Sister Simone Courtade Grant Program was created by the Sisters of Mercy to support, strengthen and sustain our organizational Mission in the community. The specific intent of the fund is to help poor and underserved residents achieve a better quality of life by improving their health and overall well-being through investment in community programs that address community health needs.

Like all such programs, the demand for these funds exceeds availability. For this reason, we have developed specific guidelines for funding that are intended to ensure that each request is judged fairly and that all applicants adhere to the traditional mission and spiritual intent of the program. This process is to be an inclusive process with opportunity for submission open to all nonprofit community entities.

There are two tiers for awarded grants:

Tier I over $3,000 up to $10,000; and Tier II less than or equal to $3,000.

All applicants are required to submit a Letter of Intent on the form provided to be considered for funding.

Deadline for Letters of Intent is March 2nd at 5:00 P.M.

Budget Template and Grant Application:

Sister Simone Budget Template

Sister Simone Courtade Application 2018-2019

Sr. Simone Courtade Grant Timeline

RFP released on or about Friday, February 16, 2018

Required Letter of Intent must be received by Friday, March 2, 2018 at 5:00 p.m. to Helen Sherman at the Health Project.

Two options will be available for new applicants to attend the Guidance Sessions. It is REQUIRED for all new applicants to attend one of the sessions. Previous grantees may be excused with prior approval. RSVP to Helen Sherman at the Health Project.

Two Pre-Application Guidance Sessions will be held on Monday, March 5, 2018

Location: Training Room  – Hackley Campus, Conference Room 1503 – 1700 Clinton St., Muskegon, MI 49442

Time: 9:00 am – 10:30 am OR 11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Applications Due on Monday, April 23, 2018 by 5:00 p.m.            

All application materials may be submitted electronically by email or by regular mail with 2 paper copies.

Award Letters will be mailed by June 30, 2018

Direct questions and submit completed application to Helen Sherman (contact information below).

Attn: Helen Sherman

Health Project

565 W. Western Avenue

Muskegon, MI 49440

Email:   missionservicesgrants@mercyhealth.com

DPATH

Diabetes Personal Action Toward Health (DPATH) is a program developed by the University of Stanford, designed to help people who are affected by diabetes. The six-week course can be useful not only for those who themselves have diabetes, but also for pre-diabetics or people living with diabetic family members and loved ones. Since the course is put on by non-medical professionals, it is not a medical class (although medications and visits to physicians are discussed as important parts of managing diabetes), but rather a practical class—offering  things like strategies to deal with difficult emotions, information on how to eat well as a diabetic (or cook for a diabetic friend or family member), relaxation techniques, and ideas for exercising and daily activity. Since life with a chronic disease is filled with choices that will affect your health, the class also spends time on decision-making.

An important part of the curriculum is establishing a weekly action plan, where each participant decides on a quantifiable, measurable goal for the week; and in each class, participants share their experiences from the past week with their action plan. Many plans revolve around exercise (walking one mile four days during the week) or nutrition (cooking supper three nights); but could include anything a person wants to achieve in the next week. These action plans give participants a way to feel accomplished and encouraged if a goal is met; and if the goal turns out to be too ambitious, participants are encouraged to modify as they go along. Back in the group, fellow classmates can celebrate successes and offer support and suggestions. Troubleshooting problems together as a class reinforces key problem-solving and decision-making skills the course teaches.

While the information in the class is valuable, what many participants find most uplifting is the support the class offers. Being in a room with 10 other people who have similar experiences and daily struggles provides a safe space for people to vent frustrations and fears that are present in the life of a diabetic, as well as people to help celebrate the victories. With the new tools and new relationships formed by the end of the class, the participants feel better-equipped to deal with their diabetes going forward.

 

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our services

The Health Project provides a number of direct services to eligible members of the community. These services include the following programs:

community spotlight

Meet Shelia Wilson

Educating providers and youth about sexual health in Muskegon County.

“We are lucky to have the low HIV rates that we do in Muskegon County; but the STI rates are very scary because HIV and other STI’s can go hand in hand”, stated Shelia Wilson, Nursing Supervisor at Public Health Muskegon County. Shelia oversees the STI and HIV Program at Public Health. Along with that, come many other responsibilities.

what’s happening

FY20 Community Benefit Board Initiative (CBBI) Grant Application

The Health Project Community Benefit Initiative Grant program was created to facilitate the investment of community benefit funds allocated to the Health Project’s Advisory Board of Directors …

Sister Simone Courtade Grant Application 2019-2020

The Sister Simone Courtade Grant Program was created by the Sisters of Mercy to support, strengthen and sustain our organizational Mission in the community. The specific intent …

Recreational Marijuana Laws: What You Need to Know

Recreational Marijuana Laws: What you need to know

Voters in Michigan passed the recreational marijuana proposal in November.  So what does this mean for Michigan? We hope …

staff highlight

Meet Emma Johnston

As a community health worker in direct service, Emma Johnston’s main concern is health insurance through the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid; but she also works with other DHS programs like food assistance and State Emergency Relief, utility bill assistance through True North and MOCAP, and any other kind of community referrals or aid possible.

 

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